“He was heard.”

The writer of the New Testament book of Hebrews writes of the suffering of Jesus. In the days of his flesh, Jesus offered up prayers and supplications, with loud cries and tears, to him who was able to save him from death, and he was heard because of his reverence. Hebrews 5:7.

“He was heard.” He was heard by God, by him “who could save him from death.” If we did not know the rest of the story we would conclude, out of our wishful view of God, he was saved from death on the cross. Only “he was heard,” and he died the next day. How could God hear his anguished pleas, his cries and tears, and not save him from the cross? How could the Father hear his cries for life and not save him from death? The Father’s will was not the torture and death of his Son, but the salvation of his Creation. The path over which the love and grace of Father and Son led them, was the path of suffering. Both Father and Son were driven by their holiness and love, love for each other and love for their Creation, for mankind. Jesus was heard. The Father answered, “Go to the cross. For the sake of those we love, die the death of sacrifice for their sins.”

It does not lessen the intensity of the pain or the grief of the loss. The suffering continues. The cries are not silenced. The tears are not dried. Yet to know that like Jesus, we are heard gives strength to persevere. We are heard. God is present. The throne of grace hears our prayers. The Father may answer, “Continue to suffer.” It doesn’t satisfy. Fairness seems so far away. Yet, remembering the Son learned obedience from his suffering strengthens our faith to persevere (Hebrews 5:8).

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This entry was posted in God, Jesus Christ, Sovereignty of God, Suffering and Faith and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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